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January 2019

A billion years in the palm of my hand: Gratitude Stones

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By Jane Redfern Jones

Where did this strange stone come from, all pockmarked with little craters? Did it fall from the moon, or maybe from a star like you and me?

This stone sitting in the palm of my hand could be anything from several million to a few billion years old. That’s hard for me to comprehend. Our time here on this earth is so short in comparison. It seems crazy to be worrying about the past or the future. It reminds me that it is not time that we should worry about, but that the ‘Now’ is the most precious thing.

“Time isn’t precious at all, because it is an illusion. What you perceive as precious is not time but the one point that is out of time: the Now. That is precious indeed. The more you are focused on time—past and future—the more you miss the Now, the most precious thing there is.” Eckhart Tolle.

Stone Meditation

We may think that we are only made of our bones, organs, blood, and muscles but we must remember that we also have our consciousness, emotions and many other things.

I will often choose a special stone to help me return to my breathing and body and connect with the world around me.

Gratitude stones are so simple yet so effective. I find they help me enormously. They are a simple way to remind ourselves to be grateful for what we have in our life.

Stone meditation is very simple and can be done anywhere anytime (to meditate is simply to think about something).

You may want to assign certain qualities to your stone such as gratitude, love, compassion, joy. The stone could also represent a loved one such as a mother, father, sibling or anyone close to you. Holding our stone we can send our love to that person as we breathe in and out three times.

The idea is that you put the stone in your pocket or bag and through the day you keep finding it there and do a little meditation. When you do it reminds you to be grateful for all you have in your life. I find that it serves as a reminder to keep my spiritual focus.

We have such busy lives it’s easy to forget how good our lives are and how lucky we are.

Any stone will do and it doesn’t have to have any writing on it. I collect stones from special places that have happy memories.

Pop your stone in your pocket with a quick ‘thank you’.

Alternatively, try putting it on your bedside table, so that you see it before you go to sleep at night and when you wake up.

Each time you see it or feel it in your pocket, pick it up and say a quick thank you for all you have, for someone special, and for the good things you experienced that day.

Don’t forget about your stone. Aim to use it every day. It will help you stay focused on the spiritual aspects of your life. After using it for a while you might find that you don’t even need to feel or see the stone because it becomes such an integral part of your day to be grateful for what you have.

A positive attitude can change our behaviour and thinking in a way that can bring peace to our lives.

So go out in your garden, down to the river or beach and find yourself a stone. Choose one that isn’t too big – ideally, it should sit in the palm of your hand.

If you would like me to send you a stone...

If you’d like one of my stones, message me with your email address, a short paragraph about yourself, and how much you’d like to give for it (including postage) and I’ll set up a Paypal transaction. I’ll choose the stone which I am most drawn to for you. I’ll put the word ‘gratitude’ on it unless you tell me you’d like something different (just simple words such as ‘love’, thank-you, or someone’s name). I’ll also add a little note.

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Facing a challenge and personal growth

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When something in my life takes a turn for the worst I have come to see it as a challenge rather than a disaster.

My boiler broke at the weekend and we had no heating or hot water. It was cold and inconvenient but it also reminded me: ·

How much glossier my hair is when washed in cold water. 

How nourishing to the soul a pure wool blanket feels.

How much deeper I sleep when I breathe cool, fresh air. 

The previous weekend my car broke down and that reminded me of how good I feel after going for a long walk.

Sometimes we come to see things as ‘luxuries’ that we can’t do without and our minds become closed to other realities.

"We are nature for all our sophistication...we are still wild, and the recovery of that vitality will itself set us right in the world." Thomas Moore.


There is something simply beautiful about the light of the moon

Full Moon
Tempted by the almost mystical light shining through my window I go into the garden. I feel a sense of awe and gratitude as the moon floods the garden and calm fields beyond with light.

I marvel at the magnificence of the full moon, but find it hard to fathom the magnitude of the universe that surrounds us.

We may have a tacit understanding of how our solar system works, but watching the full moon disappearing over the horizon reminds me of the vastness of space and the enduring mysteries of the universe we inhabit.

The sense of gratitude we have when looking skyward at night – where does it come from and to what or whom is it directed? Nature? Luck? God?

Teilhard de Chardin, a twentieth century palaeontologist and mystic, wrote in an essay ‘The soul of the world’: “There can be no doubt that we are conscious of carrying within us something greater and more indispensable than ourselves. Something that existed before we did, and could have continued to exist without us; something in which we live, and that we cannot exhaust. Something that serves us but of which we are not masters…”
It is to this unknown entity that we give thanks, whether we name it or not.

Our lives are transitory. We look up at the night sky, and we respond by giving thanks for the gift of the moment. It is good to catch that glimmer of gratitude, which is a lovely state to be in, and to fan its flame.

Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

Walking mindfully

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I’m walking through the woods.

Or am I?

Who is it that is walking?

I’m thinking about something someone had said to me earlier, worrying about something I'd forgotten to do, and I have fleeting thoughts that undermine me.

But my feelings and thoughts come and go like the dark clouds I can see in the distance.

It is a great relief to realise that none of them are ‘me’.

Science tells me that the ‘self’ is just a ‘construct', an invention of the brain working to hold together all of our experiences in a meaningful way.

I find that going for a good walk is a great way of letting go of the burden of ‘me’.

It gives me a rhythmical time for sorting out my thoughts; for coming to terms with my humanity - mortal, afflicted with doubt, feelings of vulnerability and clouded with confusion.

I don't walk away from my problems, I simply put them in perspective. I see them for what they are, and don't allow them to dominate my life with guilt, worry or anxiety.

When walking mindfully I can sometimes find it to be a challenge to let go of my thinking. 

So I concentrate on just walking, one foot after the other.

So long as I let my head and heart become clear I know that, later, things will begin to sort themselves out naturally, without effort.

I look outwards, noticing the sounds around me: the rustle of leaves as a squirrel searches for food on the ground; a barge on the canal revving its engine in the distance.

I stop and watch a robin flit from branch to branch.

My head and my heart become clear.

I consciously breathe the air and feel it give life to my  body.

The practice of mindful walking, says Thich Nhat Hanh, is a profound and pleasurable way to deepen our connection with our body and the earth. We breathe, take a mindful step, and come back to our true home.


Thoughts floating by...

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I’m out walking and I stop. In doing so I silence the sound of the heather and dead bracken being crushed by my feet, the almost soothing, familiar sound as I walked. I stop near a lake and watch the movement of the clouds reflected in the water. I think about how it is getting dark and that I should get back to the car.

I’ve stopped and I’m thinking...no...it’s not me that’s thinking...my mind is chattering to itself. I listen and notice this chatter: ‘Beautiful scenery’, ‘The colours are lovely’, ‘What’s the time?’, ‘I must remember to call at the supermarket on the way home’, ‘What time do they shut?’ ‘I should’ve brought my coat, it’s very cold’.

Gradually my jostling thoughts fall silent. I become aware of my own breathing and heartbeat. My attention is held by a cloud reflected in the water. I simply see it. I also see all the other clouds. I have no desire to move. I just stand there. Every now and then a new thought crosses my mind. I hear it in the same way as I see the clouds. Presence and distance. One thought whispers “Your thoughts are like the clouds, there are a lot of them, let them pass you by and float away, that’s fine. This moment is perfect. You don’t need or expect anything more than what you are experiencing here and now.”
 
Then my thoughts fall silent.
 
A glimpse of eternity.